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Topic: How much flexibility in placement for UST projector?
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Joined: Nov 23, 2023
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I am new to projectors. I am looking at the Epson LS800 as one option, and using this as an example: The quick start guide says the projector should be 5.9 inches from the top of the projector to the bottom of the image (for 100" projection), and 3.8 inches from the back of the projector to the image plane.

Are these minimums?

Or how precise do I really need to be?

Coming into this, I would have guessed that the projectors have some basic adjustments that help on the alignment. As long as I get the projector roughly in place relative to the screen, I can make the small adjustments needed to fine-tune the alignment. For example, how much attention do I really need to pay for the projector height to be 5.9 inches versus 5.8 or 6.0?


Thanks!
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There is no 'roughly' with UST projectors. They have fixed lenses.

Pull out your mobile phone and turn on the camera. Now, without using the zoom function of the camera, in ANY way, frame your television perfectly. You must move forward, backwards, up, down, left, and right. But you may not tilt the camera. You may not adjust zoom in any way. You may not take a photo, then digitally alter it to make it fit. You may only use the standard lens setting of your camera. If you are off by a inch, then you won't have it framed properly.

This is similar to how a UST projector works. You have no zoom. You have no lens adjustments at all. You must get the height EXACT. You must get the distance EXACT. Left and right must also be EXACT. Don't tilt it forward, don't tilt it backward, and your screen better be perfectly flat, or you will have distortion to the image.

This is somewhat unique to UST projectors. Longer throw models, especially better ones, have a lot of flexibility in placement. They often have a zoom lens. They may even feature optical lens shift.

To be fair, you DO have digital correction available. This allows you to tweak the corners of the image if you are overshooting the screen a bit. The problem is that this lowers the resolution of what you get on screen, and you lose some light output. But, the biggest complaint is that you are digitally manipulating the image, and there is just a bit of light that remains from that correction which appears as a 'light border' around the screen on your wall. It tends to be VERY visible, and a top complaint amongst those who don't have their projector set up perfectly.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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Great response! Thank you!
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Quote (maxx2 on Nov 27, 2023 1:18 PM):
Great response! Thank you!

No problem. Definitely take a look at YouTube as there are some videos out there on how to setup and align a UST projector. They do talk about using 'keystone' or 'four corner' correction like that doesn't diminish resolution and quality, which is absolutely incorrect.

It should be noted that on a poll taken over the last year, only about 25% of enthusiast owners were able to get perfect alignment of their UST projector. The rest were 'close' without using any digital correction or used some digital correction. It was an informal survey, but was mostly enthusiasts who care. So, it's not an easy challenge to get it perfectly right.

Still, if you care enough to do so, it can be done properly.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.