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Topic: ANSI Lumen Discussion: identical parts yield different brightness depending upon the projector
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Trying to understand how projectors using the identical part number are quoted as different ANSI Lumen brightness. Consider the BenQ W2000 and the BenQ W1110.
The W2000 specs claim brightness of 2000 ANSI Lumens;
and the W1110 specs say 2200 ANSI Lumens.
The lamp part number is identical: 5J.JEE05.001
Are there different lumen ratings for the lamps with identical part numbers? Or is it something like the projector power delivery to the lamp is specified in its function?

I have a BenQ W1110. The originally supplied lamp had perfectly acceptable brightness in my viewing area for the first 2 years until that lamp exploded. That taught me a lot and now I can tear down and rebuild the W1110 in about an hour all in. Since replacing the lamp some 18 months ago, the brightness has never matched the original lamp; it's much dimmer; almost green tint to everything. We coped, it was alright. Well the degradation of the lamp over 18 mos lead me to changing to a new OSRAM which is pretty much unwatchable, even in blackest night. I believe that OSRAM P-VIP 240 / 0.8 E20.9N I just bought and installed is not an equivalent part and I' guess it to be 2000 ANSI Lumens, although unspecified in both the listing and on the box labels.

So, my missus and I have found a quoted "2200 ANSI Lumen" 5J.JEE05.001 replacement lamp for the W1110 and I'll report back what I find out after installing the replacement.
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There are a ton of reasons why brightness may be different and the difference of 10% is barely noticeable to the human eye.

Power delivery could be more efficient, but it is more likely the quality of the optics or a different color wheel in use.

A larger/higher quality lens on a projector can allow a fair bit more light to pass through it making the same lamp, much brighter. Kind of like how a larger telescope lens makes the same star appear much brighter.

The color wheel is a huge factor in projectors. The lie of brightness, which almost all DLP manufacturers participate in, is the use of a 'clear' segment in their color wheel. It increases white brightness at the cost of color brightness. So, you end up with dingy colors when brightness is maximized, and a much dimmer image when the colors are properly calibrated.

This is why 6 segment color wheels (RGB/RGB) are often considered the best in home theater situations because you can get excellent colors in a good room and you may actually end up with more overall brightness because it has better colors at all brightness levels.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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Quote (AV_Integrated on Jun 16, 2021 11:57 AM):
There are a ton of reasons why brightness may be different and the difference of 10% is barely noticeable to the human eye.

Power delivery could be more efficient, but it is more likely the quality of the optics or a different color wheel in use.

A larger/higher quality lens on a projector can allow a fair bit more light to pass through it making the same lamp, much brighter. Kind of like how a larger telescope lens makes the same star appear much brighter.

The color wheel is a huge factor in projectors. The lie of brightness, which almost all DLP manufacturers participate in, is the use of a 'clear' segment in their color wheel. It increases white brightness at the cost of color brightness. So, you end up with dingy colors when brightness is maximized, and a much dimmer image when the colors are properly calibrated.

This is why 6 segment color wheels (RGB/RGB) are often considered the best in home theater situations because you can get excellent colors in a good room and you may actually end up with more overall brightness because it has better colors at all brightness levels.

Thanks for this :-)
So, following on from your explanation, I have either damaged my W1110 or it is beginning to fail? Or I have not reassembled it correctly. I must say the flimsy metal housing for the lamp itself might be a one-way fit, but that shroud is extremely tight for official replacement lamps. Are you saying tiny a variance in re-assembly can make such a massive difference? I never witnessed the original installation because the original lamp exploded.

So maybe the color wheel is beginning to fail? We use the projector very often for long periods of viewing.
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In the event my other response doesn't get get read, I'll repeat it here and add some more details:

Confirmed!!! I have just replaced the OSRAM P-VIP 240 / 0.8 E20.9N we recently purchased (a week ago) as a lamp replacement in my BenQ W1110 with a Starlight P-VIP 240 / 0.8 E20.9N purchased from PanPacSight and the difference is staggering. EXACT same part numbers! Unlike the OSRAM, the Starlight brightness and color saturation is a joy to view, where the OSRAM is dingy and green and frankly unwatchable. This newly purchased Starlight is the exact lamp I replaced the original lamp with 18 months ago. The previous Starlight mirror is peeling off the inside of the lamp. I do not recall that the just replaced Starlight lamp ever looking as nice as the Starlight lamp I just installed. Sadly, I think you need to purchase a from a few vendors and do some comparisons.

I didn't take photos to show the differences nor do I have a tool to officially measure the differences in color saturation and brightness. I can only assume the vendor I bought the OSRAM from is selling old/ used lamps. We bought 2 lamps and they are both being returned tomorrow. Those OSRAMs were purchased on Amazon...as were the Starlights.

So, identical part numbers with utterly different performance! I also have a 2200 lumen lamp incoming next week test against the Starlight.

Further, I made no other changes to re-assembly or any adjustments beyond ensuring the lamp housing was as carefully reassembled as possible.....as this W1110 housing is a flimsy thing. That said, there seems to be nothing wrong with my W1110 except the plastic getting a little beaten up from 2 deep cleans and about 6 tear-downs and rebuilds.
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SO: LET THE BUYER BEWARE!!!

Lamps are a tricky business and there are a lot of shady players out there. Osram is a highly respected company and the fact you got such poor performance may indicate that you received a fake lamp. Not definitely, but possibly.

I've heard a lot of talk over the years of lamps failing in a few months compared to factory original. It's a shame. I think Epson is really the king of lamps as they have a number of projectors which have full factory lamp replacements available for under $100 and they are rated at up to 10,000 hours. Sure, maybe you get half of that. But, at 8 hours a day that's still a couple of years between lamp replacements.

Be aware that the bulb housing deteriorates over time. A proper housing will have UV filters to help protect the optics of the projector and this is one of the reasons why manufacturers only sell the complete lamp assembly and not just the bulb. Something to keep in mind.

Super happy that you got to a successful solution!
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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