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Topic: Optoma1080HDR vs ViewSonic X10-4K
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Joined: Jun 12, 2022
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Hi there!
I have a weird setup options to pick between:
ViewSonic X10-4K or Optoma GT1080HDR. I can get them both for around $1000. I'm looking for best short-throw under this budget.

My case:
-medium daylight present
-I plan to use anti-light screen for better brightness
-screen 120
-mostly to watch movies

I'm inclined to pick the X10 for the 4K, although I know both of their 4k is fake, but I presumed X10's fake 4K is still better. It lacks the brightness however, but perhaps anti-light screen may fix this.

So I'm wondering: is it better to go for 4k (X10) or bigger brightness (Optoma), considering my case, what has a bigger impact on the image quality.

Thanks!
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Joined: Mar 28, 2005
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The Viewsonic is very poorly reviewed. The Optoma is better. Having such a low budget on a projector, then dropping just as much or more on a screen seems kind of silly to me. If you really have a pretty bad room to put it in, I would recommend a large TV as you can pick up a 85" TV for right around the $2,000 mark that the screen plus projector will cost you and it will outperform any projector in a bad room.

NO THEATER YOU'VE BEEN TO IN YOUR LIFE HAS AMBIENT LIGHT!

A good ALR screen, at $1,000+ (minimum), is a bandaid solution. It doesn't fix a bad image, it just reflects more light to viewers, harming image quality significantly. As well, you need very specific screens depending on your throw distance.

The best ALR screens I have seen to date come from those which are paired with ultra short throw (UST) projectors. The models which cost about $3,000 or more. Add in that $1,000+ screen and you are at $4,000 for minimally acceptable living room projection.

In a dark room, the Optoma is a much better choice than the Viewsonic because it will have better contrast. The BenQ HT2050a is still the best looking model under $1,000 on the market today.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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Thanks for the info!
I guess I messed with the description: the room isn't bad, I just thought the screen would make the picture better - apparently I was wrong.

I really only need short-throw, fake 4k is an added bonus. Could you advice with a budget of $2000 then?

Btw, projector central review on Viewsonic seems good
https://www.projectorcentral.com/ViewSonic-X10-4K-LED-Projector-Review.htm
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Joined: Mar 28, 2005
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So, the rule is to pick the best image and high reliability above all else. Best image comes from contrast, shadow detail, color accuracy, and image processing over resolution. Resolution is rather far down the list of things which make an image look good.

This matters because there isn't a whole lot in the world of 'short throw' 4K right now. There is a TON of ultra short throw, and it's kind of sad because short throw is much easier to setup and work with compared to ultra short throw. It also costs a fair bit less money.

Instead of just saying you need short throw, perhaps you can describe a bit more of your setup and list exactly how much distance you have from the LENS location to the screen location and how much flexibility you have with that throw distance.

Short throw is kind of like 'cold' - it is meaningless without specific context. Compared to the sun, boiling water is downright cold. So, context matters.

The reason this specific context matters is that you may have some more options open to you than you may realize, or you may have fewer options than you realize.

I am not a huge fan of Viewsonic. They rarely get image accuracy very good out of the box, and they often are playing catchup to their competitors, but get some popularity by keeping their costs low, which is good, but they often stop supporting models they release quite quickly, so if you need support, they won't have it, and their build quality isn't that high. Build quality is also a significant issue with Optoma with what I have been following for years on forums. I've heard from people who have bought two or three Optoma models which have failed within a couple of years. Kind of crazy.

One of the best models, if it fits your space, would be the BenQ TK700STi...
https://www.projectorcentral.com/BenQ-TK700STi.htm

It will be bright enough for the screen size with some ambient light in the room and BenQ has had extremely high reliability over the last ten years. The BenQ 3550 is a better choice, but likely has too far of a throw distance for your space.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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Thanks a lot for your time!
Context definitely matters.

Placement:
I rent a flat, so that unfortunately rules out the ceiling placement. I want projector table-top not far from screen, because my projector experience shows I feel better located around 2.5 m from the screen. That puts projector somewhere in front of me, say 2 m, to produce 120 inch image on projection screen. I feel it's not very likely, so I'll have to move from 2.5 to 3m etc, but I want to get the biggest image with the least distance. I'm a bit concerned with angle issues as well - can I actually get it to project 120 inch placed on a table in front of the screen? I sense there are many ways it can go wrong.

There is another option: I *could* try to place projector on some high stand or shelf, bought specifically for this purpose, and locate it behind myself - 3-4 m from the screen. It seems complicated and risky, I might be unable to get a perfect stand or might be unable to locate projector properly - so I would risk this only if you'd say it makes all the difference and it's worth the risk.

Light:
The room should be good for viewing as I decided (after you explained specifics of anti-light screens) to install blackout blinds. Daily light is moderate but let's consider it a good environment - I can always use blinds when I want a really good picture. Youtube as a daily watching is good with an okay picture. I expect to watch less demanding content during the sunlight time.

Setup:
I use Apple TV as an input with 4k + Dolby Atmos source, HDMI 2.0 cable. I will likely use some home theater receiver for sound (say, Harman Kardon AVR 235).

Use case:
Movies (4k included), YouTube, Netflix.
Gaming is a big plus, but can be sacrificed.
[Edited by Dmit865 on Jun 14, 2022 at 5:26 PM]
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