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Topic: Need help looking for a projector for rear projection on steep ceiling
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Joined: Jun 2, 2021
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I really need some help finding a projector. Last year my church finally decided to install screens and projectors, and I was tasked to find appropriate projectors and thought I had. Unfortunately when we had someone come to install them about a month or 2 ago it was discovered that because of how steep our ceilings are the projectors don't really work.

The projectors that we initially purchased are Optoma GT1090HDR Short Throw units for the 100 inch screens that we purchased. It turns out that the offset of the Optoma's is what is getting us. Since then I have done more digging and talked with the group we are working with to install the projector and turns out it would be more ideal to have a projector with a -50% offset. I need help finding a short throw projector with that type of offset, I have been searching but can't find them.

The budget I am working with would be about $1400 per projector. Any help and advice would be appreciated. When I can I will try to post an image of the area(s) the projectors will be living.
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Because of a lack of standardized terms, 50% offset doesn't mean anything. Manufacturers use offset differently and do a terrible job with this term.

Typically, with a projector upright, offset is measured from the center of the screen, downward, as a relationship to screen height. So, 50% offset, would put the center of the lens at the bottom of the screen. This is somewhat typical offset.

0% offset, would be the center of the lens, at the center of the screen.

Well, guess what people typically prefer? The projector having to be raised 6 feet into the air in the middle of all viewing, or to be placed on a table right near the bottom edge of the screen? Or maybe even lower?

So, most projectors have 50% offset or more. Sometimes a fair bit more, sometimes a bit less. But few to none have 0% offset to have the projector on axis to the center of the screen.

You have a huge headache if you are trying to find a model which is outside of industry norm. A HUGE headache. This just isn't done. Short throw projectors are designed around the industry that buys the most of them, and it isn't going to be anyone but those who are using them for front projection, sitting on a desk, most often teaching institutions or working professionals.

I'm not sure exactly what you are specifically after, but if you don't want that projector mounted at the bottom of the image, or flipped upside down at the top of the image, you aren't going to have much luck anywhere near your budget unfortunately.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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Quote (AV_Integrated on Jun 7, 2021 9:19 AM):
Because of a lack of standardized terms, 50% offset doesn't mean anything. Manufacturers use offset differently and do a terrible job with this term.

Typically, with a projector upright, offset is measured from the center of the screen, downward, as a relationship to screen height. So, 50% offset, would put the center of the lens at the bottom of the screen. This is somewhat typical offset.

0% offset, would be the center of the lens, at the center of the screen.

Well, guess what people typically prefer? The projector having to be raised 6 feet into the air in the middle of all viewing, or to be placed on a table right near the bottom edge of the screen? Or maybe even lower?

So, most projectors have 50% offset or more. Sometimes a fair bit more, sometimes a bit less. But few to none have 0% offset to have the projector on axis to the center of the screen.

You have a huge headache if you are trying to find a model which is outside of industry norm. A HUGE headache. This just isn't done. Short throw projectors are designed around the industry that buys the most of them, and it isn't going to be anyone but those who are using them for front projection, sitting on a desk, most often teaching institutions or working professionals.

I'm not sure exactly what you are specifically after, but if you don't want that projector mounted at the bottom of the image, or flipped upside down at the top of the image, you aren't going to have much luck anywhere near your budget unfortunately.


To summarize I am trying to find a short throw projector that when installed the center of the lens would be aligned with the center of the screen vs the standard of short throw projectors where the center of the lens is above the top of the projected image when mounted to a ceiling.
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A fixed axis lens, I have ONLY seen on projectors with interchangeable lenses, which means you are in a high budget model. Also, these lenses are typically about .5:1 throw ratio, not shorter than that.

Ultra short throw (UST), or ANYTHING, that you want to get on a budget, has to hit the greatest market. Projection, in general, has a market for front projection, so the build is going to be for those models. Putting a projector, on axis, in the dead center of the screen just sucks for front projection. Even worse for UST.

I'm afraid what you want is not something I've ever seen in my life from UST. Short throw with interchangeable lenses is available from most major manufacturers. But, even when you get their new high dollar UST lenses ($5,000+), you end up with a ton of offset.

Epson has a nice refurb website for projectors with interchangeable lenses from around $2,000. But, a on-axis short throw lens is several thousand dollars typically... and it won't be UST.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.