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Topic: AVR & Speakers with Netflix audio
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Joined: Sep 28, 2017
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Has anyone noticed that on occasion when watching content on Netflix, that there will be sibilance/slight distortion coming from your HT speakers? I've noticed this mainly in the center channel, when dialogue is spoken. This doesn't happen all the time. I have never had this issue when watching content from a Bluray/DVD. Sound is always crystal clear. What is the reasoning behind this, with Netflix? I've never really had a problem with the video, as that most often is not of a lesser quality/distorted. Someone on another website mentioned that it is related to encoding and the AVR, and that newer AVR's have fixed the problem. Not sure if this is the case?

While on the subject of speakers and Netflix, I think they should offer uncompressed audio (like what you hear with Bluray and DTS-MA, Dolby HD). Netflix only seems to offer DD, or compressed audio. Many times you seem to need to turn up the volume on your receiver pretty high to get loud sound out of your speakers. Not so with Bluray (with DTS-MA and Dolby HD, most any HT speakers, no matter how small or cheap, actually sound really great). I would actually be willing to pay a higher Netflix monthly rate to get better audio? Anyone agree with any of this? Thanks
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Typically I blame the service, not the receiver, for issues. Streaming is as streaming does. That is, if there is any hold up to your network stream from Netflix, they may let the audio go first then the video or any number of other options. People love Netflix, myself included, and I can't say that I've noticed any issue with running Netflix.

But, you may want to consider what device you are using to connect to Netflix. Is it a Roku, AppleTV, Chromecast, laptop, or some other smart device which is connected to your A/V receiver?

Hopefully you aren't using your Blu-ray player to get Netflix as the apps in most Blu-ray Disc players are of pretty low quality and Blu-ray players are designed for (get ready for this) PLAYING BLU-RAY DISCS! So, if you haven't tried a dedicated streaming device, it may be time to go that route. Roku is a very strong performer in this category.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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Yes, I always play Netflix through an older Blu-Ray player. I wasn't aware that their apps are of a lower quality. There is a Netflix button right on the remote for the Blu Ray player, for easy access to Netflix.

I also have a Roku streaming stick, but don't really use it for Netflix, as I thought I was getting better quality with playing Netflix through the Blu-Ray player. It is a Panasonic Blu-Ray player, and it got stellar reviews for picture quality when it first was released. Also, the Blu-Ray player can decode many more high quality audio formats (DTS-Master HD, Dolby True HD, etc.) than Roku can. I guess though if you are playing your Roku through the AVR, via HDMI, that that is a moot point, as that can play all those audio formats
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Joined: Mar 25, 2005
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I had a problem where the audio would cut in and out for a few seconds at a time, when streaming Netflix. I finally figured out it only happened when I selected Digital 5.1 in the sound options. It does not happen in stereo mode.
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Quote (dmdbur on Sep 11, 2019 11:00 AM):
I also have a Roku streaming stick, but don't really use it for Netflix, as I thought I was getting better quality with playing Netflix through the Blu-Ray player. It is a Panasonic Blu-Ray player, and it got stellar reviews for picture quality when it first was released.

The Netflix app is likely under-performing on your Panasonic player compared to the Roku. Roku is just one heck of a device.

That said, you should try it and see if you have the same issues using Netflix on the streaming stick vs. the BD player.

As a rule, I try to get the best device available for what I will be watching. So, I have a Roku Ultimate for streaming (about $100), and a Sony UHD BD player, which I will upgrade to a Oppo when Best Buy finally releases their floor model to me. Then a PANASONIC for my normal Blu-ray viewing in my home.

Yes, Panasonic has made some great electronics through the years, but the major manufacturers don't deliver the same goods with their streaming apps the way that Roku does. Another major favorite is the nVidia Shield TV.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.