Not logged in
 
Author
Topic: New 16:10 TV/movies projector - please advice
member
Joined: May 14, 2019
Posts: 3
Reply to PostAlert Moderator
Hi All.
I would like to buy new projector, because my old OPTOMA H180X (1280x800 WXGA)is broken. Price max. 800$.
I want 16:10 ratio projector, because projection area on the wall has exactly that ratio (projection from 4,1m distance, ceiling mount, 300cm diagonal) and usually I watch TV(most of TV channels have also that ratio), sometimes BR/DVD and sometimes data from my computer. Everting goes through AV receiver Yamaha RX-V675 to projector via HDMI.
I was thinking about WUXGA(1920x1200), but there are only a few of them and usually for businnes presentations.
Now I see Acer H6530BD and Optoma WU334. Is that Optoma good choice?
Plase can You advice me? I am really lost in it.
Thank you very much for any advice.

Maybe I should buy 16:9, I dont like it, but maybe I dont undestand why it is better for me than 16:10. Watching TV channels is priority of using projector. Almost everyday.
r.
[Edited by w219805 on May 14, 2019 at 2:45 AM]
moderator
Joined: Mar 28, 2005
Posts: 12,279
Reply to PostAlert Moderator
Well, yes, you have a bit of a conundrum.

16:10 has never been a video standard. It was pushed, for quite a while, by the PC industry, and is still a very common aspect ratio used by business class projectors. In fact, you will find dozens and dozens of 1920x1200 projectors.

But, to my knowledge, almost none of them are designed for home theater.

This is because there is absolutely ZERO 16:10 aspect ratio video content.

HDTV is the same aspect ratio as every single TV in Best Buy. That's 16:9. PS3, XBox, etc. are all 16:9. At this point, almost every single laptop and every single computer monitor sold is overwhelmingly 16:9 aspect ratio.

There are some oddball exceptions, but reality has caught up with the computer world and 16:10 is more or less... dead.

So, it really depends on what your goal is. If your goal, as you state, is to watch regular television, and get the best quality out of it, then 16:9 is the format is is broadcast in, and 16:9 is the heart of home theater projectors. Home theater models (typically) have better contrast, better motion handling, image processing, black levels, and shadow detail. This is in favor of brightness, which is often the top concern for business class models which must fight ambient light rooms more often.

Why do so many business models still use the 16:10 aspect ratio? Because so many installers used 16:10 screens. A 16:10 projector works on a 16:10 screen, a 16:9 screen, or even a 4:3 screen. So, it covers all the bases with one resolution.

In reality, if you can, you would be much better off reframing your screen setup to 16:9 if you can, because it matches far better.

Now, I'm not sure how the H180X you have worked with the vast majority of content already being in the 16:9 format. I do know that there is basically nothing in the home theater segment which is 16:10.

But, here is the list...
https://www.projectorcentral.com/projectors.cfm?g=1&hide=0&st=1&exp1=1&r=16&br=&c=&w=&db=&ar=&zr=&wt=<g=&ll=&wr=&dt=&mfg=&p=100&p=1000&t=&pjl=0&pjw=0&pjh=0&td=&is=&i=d&tr=&tr2=&exp5=1&oop=2&sort=pop&sz=15#top

That's keeping the price under $1,000. As you move up in price you get a ton more options that are available.

The Epson HC1040 would likely be the model I would go with from that list, but I'm not sure you are getting much of an upgrade over the H180X.

And that's another rub.

You are going from entry level to entry level, and while resolution will jump, you aren't going to see almost any improvement in contrast or color which are items which do matter.

The jump to sub $1,000 1080p projectors is massive...
https://www.projectorcentral.com/projectors.cfm?g=1&hide=0&st=1&exp1=1&r=13&br=&c=&w=&db=&ar=&zr=&wt=<g=&ll=&wr=&dt=&mfg=&p=100&p=1000&t=&pjl=0&pjw=0&pjh=0&td=&is=&i=d&tr=&tr2=&exp5=1&oop=2&sort=pop&sz=15#top

With the BenQ HT2050a and the Optoma HD27HDR being models which are way up on the list as options.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
member
Joined: May 14, 2019
Posts: 3
Reply to PostAlert Moderator
Thank you very much for your time and advice.
I'll go for 16:9.
Now is for me priority low noise (old projector was at the end very noise, however I cleaned it's inside often)
and high brightness, because my livingroom is very bright.
I decided for:
OPTOMA HD29H for 800€ (European equivalent of HD27HDR?). I'm from Europe. Hope it is worth it's price.
Thank you.
member
Joined: May 14, 2019
Posts: 3
Reply to PostAlert Moderator
Hi.
Now I am also thinking about BENQ TK800. Here I can buy it for 930€.
Maybe it is worth to buy than OPTOMA OPTOMA HD29H for 760€.
Except 4k vs 1080p, what is so important to prefer to buy OPTOMA HD29H?
I see in comparsion that BENQ TK800 has less brightness, less contrast, higher noise, lower lamp life, eats more power...
But I think for Money BenQ as 4k is good chice, isn't it?
Can you advice me please.
I want buy it today/tommorow,Thank you very much for your advice.
[Edited by w219805 on May 16, 2019 at 7:00 AM]
moderator
Joined: Mar 28, 2005
Posts: 12,279
Reply to PostAlert Moderator
The Optoma is likely to deliver better contrast, better color brightness, and better shadow detail than the BenQ.

I'm not sure that you would know the difference unless they were side by side and I think BenQ gives a solid product. So, if you would prefer to go with the native faux-K DLP chip, then by all means do so. There is very little that I'm aware of with pricing so I didn't know any 4K models would be in the price range.

I'm perfectly fine with the TK800.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.