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Topic: Hi! I´m new here. I´m trying to decide between two projectors.
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Joined: Jan 22, 2018
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Hi! I´m new here. I´m trying to decide between two projectors: Epson Home Cinema 2150 and Optoma HD39Darbee.

I read a great article about these two entry-level projectors, from M. David Stone:
http://www.projectorcentral.com/Epson-HC-2150-vs-Optoma-HD39Darbee-review.htm

( A summary of the article:

"Important are differences in brightness and contrast, although both are the opposite of what you would expect from the specs. The HD39Darbee has the higher brightness rating, at 3,500 ANSI lumens, compared with 2,500 lumens for the HC 2150. However, we measured both at essentially the same brightness in their brightest modes, and the HC 2150 is brighter in the modes you're most likely to use. That translates to the HC 2150 delivering more saturated color in higher levels of ambient light and gives it the advantage in a brightly lit room. The story for contrast follows the same pattern with the roles reversed. Though the HC 2150 has the higher contrast rating, the HD39Darbee actually has visibly better contrast--at least for 2D. In the dark or in dim lighting, that gives it more vibrant color and a greater sense of depth

Epson Home Cinema 2150 (2500 ANSI Lumens):
Dynamic: 2823 ansi lumens
Cinema 1784 lumens
Natural 1735 ansi lumens

Optoma HD39Darbee (3500 ANSI Lumens):
Bright 2836 ansi lumens !!!!!!
Cinema 1155 ansi lumens !!!!!!!!
Reference 593 ansi lumens !!!!!!!!!" )

I´m a cinematographer buying my first projector and I´m in a budget. I´m sorry if my english is not the best, I´m from Argentina. I will be using the projector in two different fully darkened environments for film projections trying to watch them as good-natural-calibrated as possible. I used your calculator.

Primary I will be using the projector in my room: Diagonal screen size: 65, Throw distance: 7' 3". In both projectors I have too much light? Can I to put the brightness(?) of the projector down enough so I can to see the image in ideal conditions? (The HD39Darbee has the Reference mode, that has low lumens, I suspect I will be ok with that. What about the Epson? Can I put lumens or brightness down enough in some way? Do I need put a ND filter?

Secondly, but not less important I will be using the projector in a BIG room for movie projections with other filmmakers: Diagonal screen size: 136", Throw distance: 18' 1". Both projectors match ok in the calculator for "Recommended image brightness". But I´m affraid of the HD39Darbee, because I want to see the colors in a quite proper way and what I´m reading in your article is that the only way I can see quite real colors is in the Reference mode (593 lumens) and even in the Cinema mode is only 1155 lumens (1739 on the Natural mode of the Epson 2150). In that case I´m afraid the Optoma wont be enough lumens t for an ideal projection. As the real measurements on the HD39 are really lower than 3500 lumens (even lower than the 2150 that is in the limit of "ok" in the calculator for the big screen and long distance I have). Will be the Epson 2150 the best choice?

I realize that the HD39 has better contrast and blacks in small rooms, but what about my big room? Can I calibrate the HD39 to see skin tones them in a natural look and being able to project it in my big room with long throw distance?
Or do I have to consider the Optoma HD39 like a 1600 lumens projector in the calculator, that is not enough for my BIG room?
Also I can't see on the web any pictures of projected images of the Hd39 so I can´t see how skin tones are.
In the case of the Epson 2150 from the pictures I see I suspect it has really natural and beautiful skin tones.

I know I will be able to calibrate a projector in a good way. I could bring the gamma down on the Epson 2150, enabling the Superwhite and balancing brightness and contrast.
I realice that the HD39 has better contrast and blacks in small rooms, but what about my big room? And what about skin tones, can I calibrate them in a natural look and being able to project it in my big room with long throw distance?

I´m also interested in the Darbee mode, but I don´t want nothing to look fake or over sharpened. So I don´t know if in it´s a lowest mode, the Darbee will be much different from the picture enhancement of the Epson 2150, or even so different from adding a little of sharpness from a VLC player...

Sorry for all these questions.

What projector do you think is better for me?

Maybe another model? I can´t pay more than 900 uss.
A friend of mine offered me a Panasonic PT-AE3000U with 2000 hours but I think it´s too old and their 1600 lumens are not bright enough...

The buy of this projector is really very important for me,

Thank you very much in advance!

All the best!

Juan
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The Optoma projectors use a 2x color wheel which leads to much lower color brightness than the equivalent 4x/6x BenQ HC2050 model or the Epson 2150 model.

IMO, the only two to really consider are the Epson or the BenQ, and the BenQ will outperform the Epson in most areas that matters most, specifically contrast.

Color will be similar between the two, and I use a previous BenQ on a 161" diagonal screen.

It must be said that if you are talking about a reference setup of a projector on a 65" screen, I'm not aware of a single model that is really designed for this. 65" is about half the screen size that projectors start to be designed for. You may need to run them in low lamp mode and still then, may need to purchase a neutral density filter to bring down the light output even more to have a usable image on such a small screen.

All this said, I would get the BenQ HC2050 over the Epson, and I wouldn't even consider the Optoma.

Finally, please understand that these are entry level projectors. They aren't anywhere near the quality of the projectors which cost two, three, or five times as much money. You are not going to get inky black levels, or near silence from them during operation. Their lens quality is good, but not great. Their image processing is good, but not great. They are still quite good, but not anywhere near what a projector like the Sony HW45ES would be, or the Epson 5040, or any of the JVC models.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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Joined: Jan 22, 2018
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Thank you very much for your answer!!!

Yes, I fully understand that these projectors are quite good, but not very good. I will make the experience with an entry level projector and then buy something like the Epson 5040 in the future.

I can't find the BenQ HC2050.
I found the BenQ HT2050. Is that the projector do you recommend, OK?

I put the HT2050 on the Calculator. Can yo tell me please from what point of the projector do you measure the distance? It´s something like the focal plane on photography? Around the center of the projector?
I used the calculator and because of the 1.3X zoom on the BenQ, I think will not be able to place the projector at the distance I need on my big room.
Do you recommend me another one with 1.6x zoom or I should go with the Epson 2150?

What cheap but quite good quality ND filter do you recommend me to buy. ND 0.3? ND 0.6? I can't find this projector has a filter thread. Or I should try first to avoid the extra brightness with the projector settings?

Thank you very much!!!

Juan

Quote (AV_Integrated on Jan 22, 2018 3:17 PM):
The Optoma projectors use a 2x color wheel which leads to much lower color brightness than the equivalent 4x/6x BenQ HC2050 model or the Epson 2150 model.

IMO, the only two to really consider are the Epson or the BenQ, and the BenQ will outperform the Epson in most areas that matters most, specifically contrast.

Color will be similar between the two, and I use a previous BenQ on a 161" diagonal screen.

It must be said that if you are talking about a reference setup of a projector on a 65" screen, I'm not aware of a single model that is really designed for this. 65" is about half the screen size that projectors start to be designed for. You may need to run them in low lamp mode and still then, may need to purchase a neutral density filter to bring down the light output even more to have a usable image on such a small screen.

All this said, I would get the BenQ HC2050 over the Epson, and I wouldn't even consider the Optoma.

Finally, please understand that these are entry level projectors. They aren't anywhere near the quality of the projectors which cost two, three, or five times as much money. You are not going to get inky black levels, or near silence from them during operation. Their lens quality is good, but not great. Their image processing is good, but not great. They are still quite good, but not anywhere near what a projector like the Sony HW45ES would be, or the Epson 5040, or any of the JVC models.

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All measurements are from the front of the lens to the plane of the screen.

I am not sure which model I would go with if I couldn't make the BenQ work, but I would likely take the Epson 2150.

No projectors have threaded lenses to my knowledge, and you should try to make it work with calibration and brightness settings over adding an external accessory.

Since I haven't used a ND filter, I don't have a specific recommendation on what to use, or really how to rig it all up, but it's important to maintain airflow around a projector should it get to that need.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.