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Topic: Need your help to work out type of projector for Animation at Arts Festival
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Joined: Jun 8, 2017
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Hi,

New to the forum so I’ll apologise upfront if I am posting in the wrong place or asking daft questions.

I’m putting on piece of work for a 3 day Arts festival. It involves projecting an piece HD video of stop motion animation in an agricultural building at night.

It’s an arts project with a small budget, so I’m looking to do this for as low as cost as possible but needs to the end result has to be a decent standard. (asking for miracles??).

I looking for advice on the type of projectors, lumens needed etc and any model suggestions that might do the job.

Do I need to hire a specialist projector or might it be possible to purchase a consumer projector? (I will be likely to be putting on more similar work in the future)


Details:
Size of projected image based on 16:9 aspect: Approximately width 5m by height 2.8m - diagonal 5.7m
The animation has a widescreen aspect ratio of 2.35:1 (I understand that use of an anamorphic lens is optimal but expensive - so keen to explore other options)
Time of day: From dusk into the night.
There are several locations being considered 2 are outside and one is in a agricultural building with some large openings in the side walls for ambient light to enter.
Front projection is going to be most practical with the location.
Projection surface: The most probably location has option for screen material to stretched over a mesh frame (I understand that the screen has a major impact in the final viewed image)
Other considerations: it will be a full moon that weekend.
The work is black and white - rather subtle. Have attached a still

Many thanks in advance

Nick

Attachments:

Still from Arts Festival Animation

1200 × 511 pixels (70.18 KB)
  
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Joined: Mar 28, 2005
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Realistically, you are looking at a screen size of about 171 square feet. You want about 15 to 20 real world lumens for viewing in a dark theater space.

The darker the space, the better the final outcome will be.

Contrast will be a big part of this as well.

If the entire presentation is black and white, then perhaps a projector with a non-RGB color wheel will be better. RGB color wheels are great to improve color in movies, but non-RGB models can get brighter. These are DLP projectors vs. LCD projectors.

At 15 to 20 lumens per square foot, that's about 2,700 to 3,500 real world lumens and it MUST be after dark. Advertised lumens and real world lumens are completely different.

I would be looking for something closer to 5,000 lumens advertised, or look for models tested to deliver higher lumen output in actual testing.

This model jumps out as a good choice:
http://www.projectorcentral.com/epson-home-cinema-1440-projector-review.htm

It's been reviewed at over 4,000 lumens and the price is extremely affordable. This can deliver the size you need with the brightness you need as well.

If you find that the price is high, then you have got to check for projector rentals to your location and the cost of them. You may be able to rent something for under $500 which can do the trick.

But, I would bet that if you bought something like the Epson, then you could easily resell it for 90% of the purchase price, saving money over a rental model.

Looking through this list:
http://www.projectorcentral.com/projectors.cfm?g=1&hide=0&st=1&r=16&br=5000&br=6000&c=&w=&ar=&db=&zr=&wt=<g=&ll=&mfg=&p=&wr=&dt=&t=&pjl=0&pjw=0&pjh=0&td=&is=&i=d&tr=&tr2=&oop=1&sort=%24&sz=15

or this list:
http://www.projectorcentral.com/projectors.cfm?g=1&hide=0&st=1&r=13&br=5000&br=6000&c=&w=&ar=&db=&zr=&wt=<g=&ll=&mfg=&p=&wr=&dt=&t=&pjl=0&pjw=0&pjh=0&td=&is=&i=d&tr=&tr2=&oop=1&sort=%24&sz=15

Isn't a bad way to go. They are sorted by price and both lists have the resolution necessary to really deliver and the brightness you should need for after dark movie viewing at the size you requested.

You can see in the review that a cheap model like this:
http://www.projectorcentral.com/Acer-P6500.htm

While it is bright enough, it doesn't product the most even image. It has poor brightness uniformity which may impact the presentation. So, while there are cheaper models, you tend to give something up.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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Thanks very much for your in depth reply. It's been very helpful and thrown up a couple of further questions:


I'm interested to know your thoughts setup difficulties that could arise from a projector with no lens shift and using it in different locations.


From my limited understanding; a Single-chip DLP projector could show rainbows and a 3 chip LCD the problem doesn't happen.
Will a black and white video on a DLP projector be more or less prone to rainbows?

Thanks again

Nick
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Black and white tends to introduce more RBE issues with DLP than color presentations. It depends on how long people will be looking at it and their RBE sensitivity.

I struggle a bit, because both technologies have some advantages/disadvantages. On the cheaper side, DLP will have better contrast, which will give you more pop from your presentation. But, it definitely has the potential for RBE issues.

The Epson 1440 was recommended based a great deal on price. It's LCD, so no RBE issues, and really has solid brightness for your presentation. Blacks won't be as deep as they are with DLP, so that's a tradeoff.

Setup is an issue if you don't have as much zoom range or lens shift, but those features cost money. A model like the Epson 3700..
http://www.projectorcentral.com/Epson-PowerLite_Home_Cinema_3700.htm
...is a really nice option. It's still priced well, and while not as bright, it is still measured to be far brighter than a typical home theater model and should be bright enough for your setup. It does have lens shift, and reasonable zoom range. Lens shift is typical, so a bit above the screen to a bit below the screen or anywhere between. Not 5 feet above the screen!

So much depends on your budget on this, but I think if I wanted a projector designed for good contrast with solid brightness and really good placement flexibility, then that's the way I would go.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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Thanks again for your extremely helpful information.

I'm in Australia so it's been interesting as projectors have different model numbers or aren't even offered here

I was pretty keen on the Epson Home Cinema 1440 you recommended but unfortunately I can't purchase here.

I found a good price on a similar spec model.
http://www.epson.com.au/products/projector/EB-4950WU_Specs.asp?groupid=94

It is described as a large venue, more for presentations and I'm wondering what the tradeoffs would be against one that was specifically for home cinema.
Lower contrast (only 5000:1 vs Up to 15,000:1 with the 1440) and no frame interpolation. On the plus side it has lens shift.
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