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Topic: What does the graph mean in these results from Projector Calculator?
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Joined: Dec 30, 2016
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Hi all.

I was playing with the Projector Calculator and I was wondering what it means when you see the warning:

"Recommend Image Brightness for rooms with ambient light"

For the size of my screen, it's telling me how far I need to mount the projector, but I'm seeing that the chart is in the red portion. Should I be concerned?

Attachments:

4x3

719 × 626 pixels (49.84 KB)

16x9

716 × 654 pixels (50.69 KB)
 
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Joined: Mar 28, 2005
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Kind of a weird location to post this question. Are you looking for an education projector or a gaming projector or what? What is your room like? What is your budget? The GT1080 is decent, but it is outperformed by the BenQ HT2150ST.

Anyway, when it says you can have some ambient light in the room, it means just that. You can have some light on in the room and still have an acceptable image.

The use of 'RED' as a color is stupid, and has been an issue with the calculator as long as I can remember.

You can always cut light output from most projectors, and over time the lamp dims. There is rarely an issue or concern with too much light output from almost any projector.

The issue, far more often, is the exact opposite.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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Quote (AV_Integrated on Dec 31, 2016 7:52 AM):
Kind of a weird location to post this question. Are you looking for an education projector or a gaming projector or what? What is your room like? What is your budget? The GT1080 is decent, but it is outperformed by the BenQ HT2150ST.

Anyway, when it says you can have some ambient light in the room, it means just that. You can have some light on in the room and still have an acceptable image.

The use of 'RED' as a color is stupid, and has been an issue with the calculator as long as I can remember.

You can always cut light output from most projectors, and over time the lamp dims. There is rarely an issue or concern with too much light output from almost any projector.

The issue, far more often, is the exact opposite.

Ok good to know. Thanks for the reply!

I looked at the HT2150ST but the throw distance isn't going to work for me since I want to be able to adjust the format from 4:3 to 16:9 on a sliding track. The sliding track doesn't have enough movement to handle the difference in the throw distance on the HT2150ST but it should be perfect based on the 1080GT.

The projector is going to be used for a golf simulator. So when I'm golfing, I want it to be in 4:3 and when I'm watching movies, I want it to be in 16:9
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I've attached the projector calculator throw distances for the HT2150ST

The sliding track can handle a throw distance of 17".

Based on the attached, the HT2150ST needs about 23" to properly go from 4:3 to 16:9.

Am I reading that correctly?

Attachments:

HT2150ST - 4x3

715 × 622 pixels (54.46 KB)

HT2150ST - 16x9

719 × 618 pixels (56.02 KB)
 
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Not really. You have it set on the 'center' of the zoom range.

With a 94" wide 4:3 image, the projector can throw that from between 86" to 104".

With a 94" wide 16:9 image, the projector can throw that from between 65" to 78".

So, the projector needs to be at least 86" back to throw 4:3 and can be up to 78" back to throw 16:9. That's only 8" difference between the two.

But, the heights are completely different and you just don't do things like that with a projector.

Once again!

Are you looking for an education projector or a gaming projector or what? What is your room like? What is your budget?

ADD: Do you already have a screen you are trying to use? Can you replace it if you do have it?

The easiest, and proper setup, is to pair a 16:9 screen with a 16:9 projector. High-budget and unusual room setups with better projectors sometimes utilize 2.35 screens, but this is not something I recommend for most people and setups.

4:3 screens and setups need to be replaced.

If you just want to show 4:3 content, then that will work just like it does if you show 4:3 content on a 16:9 television. You will have black bars on the left/right of the image. This is normal. You don't adjust the projector to do this.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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