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Topic: Need Advice on Projector
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Joined: Feb 10, 2016
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Trying to lighten the load for my sales people on the cheap (<$600)
We currently use a TX1080 and a BOSE tower speaker. I wanted to try an Optoma HD141X because it seemed to triple the lumens of the InFocus IN1146 I was also considering.

The Optoma is Home Theater and the Infocus is a business portable. (Compare & Contrast)

Optoma Pros

Better image
Zoomable
2 HDMI Inputs

Infocus Pros

WAY Lighter
More Road worthy?

Cost is close to same!

Use: Showing 1080P commercials of exotic tropical vacation spots to prospective clients. Dark room not always guaranteed. Proper Skin tones ESSENTIAL!

What say you?
At the price point is there better?
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The major difference is one uses a LED based lamp and the other uses a traditional lamp. The 141X is entry level home theater and uses a 2x color wheel, so color rendition will not be as good as it is on the LED model. As well, once calibrated, it will deliver closer to 1,000-1,200 lumens, nowhere near what is claimed. This is typical of 2x DLP projectors.

The BenQ HC2050 will deliver more lumens after calibration (about 10% to 20% brighter), and has a RGB/RGB color wheel. Still, it uses standard lamps, so that's a cost to consider.

It's also a durability question. LED based projectors have no color wheel. They aren't just lighter, they are potentially a bit more durable. Traditional lamp based DLP models have a color wheel inside of it which can be a point of failure. You don't just toss it in your bag and take it with you. You must show more care with these.

Also, instead of 30,000 hour lamps, you get 3,000 hour lamps. You can replace them, but it's an added expense. Typically about $200-$300 for a manufacturer original replacement.

The Epson 2040 is arguably the best model for this type of situation. It uses LCD instead of DLP which should produce slightly more saturated color rendition and the lack of a color wheel like DLP has may make it a bit more durable for travel. Finally, replacement lamps are $130 which is about half of the competition's price.

Both the BenQ and the Epson are about $800 instead of $600.

Not sure how many you need to purchase, but the Optoma is $250 less, which makes it very tempting. It just doesn't actually reach anywhere near the claimed lumens once calibrated properly.

But, the IN1146 doesn't come close either. It only puts out about 370 lumens once calibrated.

READ REVIEWS - They matter a great deal, and matter far more than published specifications do.

Epson - Brightest (1,500 real world lumens), no color wheel, excellent color saturation, cheaper replacement lamps.
BenQ - Next brightest (about 1,200 lumens), RGB/RGB color wheel, very good colors, more expensive replacement lamps
Optoma - Third brightest (about 1,000 lumens), 2x RGBCYW color wheel, good colors, more expensive replacement lamps
InFocus (current) - Dim (about 350 lumens), no color wheel, very good colors, no replacement lamps required, not 1920x1080 resolution.

There is no 'home run' model out there right now. In the future we will see 1,000+ lumen 1920x1080 LED projectors for $500 or so, but we aren't there yet. The LG PF1500U is as close as it gets, and it doesn't come anywhere near it's claimed lumen rating.

If I were to buy, and didn't need a ton of projectors, then I would get the Epson. It will blow away what you have right now.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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Changing directions as our main workhorse Optoma TX 1800 refuses to find sources. The scarier news is I am considering the Optoma EH515 to replace it.

Is there anything brighter and/or better picture in the 2 grand range?


Needs

Spot on skintones and high def color accuracy

Rugged for travel

Zoomable for different room dimensions

Looks ok in less than darkness (occasional conference room lighting)


Thoughts?
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I would lean towards the Panasonic or Sony models on this list:

http://www.projectorcentral.com/projectors.cfm?g=1&hide=0&st=1&mfg=&p=1500&p=2100&w=&r=16&br=&ll=<g=&t=&db=&dt=1.0.0&c=&ar=&dvi=&wr=&pjl=&pjw=&pjh=&td=&is=&i=d&tr=&oop=1&sort=%24&sz=15

Bright, LCD, very good color, properly bright. Hits your budget.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.