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Topic: Sony VPL-CX80 Projector
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Hi guys. First time I am posting something here. I have just purchased my second projector which is Sony VPL-CX80 Projector. I have purchased it used and it does not come with a remote control.

I have noticed on the right portion of the projected image there is a little bit of red tint going on, albeit barely visible. The red tint can only be visible with a careful observation. Any clues on how to fix this? I am an IT guy, and I fix computers and pretty much any IT devices including LED and Plasma panels, except projectors. Projector is kind of new to me, although I have also purchased a brand new Epson EX7220 Projector before this SONY. Another thing is where can I buy a remote control for Sony VPL-CX80?

Also, any good online or real stores that sell a reasonably priced bulb for Sony VPL-CX80 and Epson EX7220 Projectors in Canada?
Epson sells $100 for the bulb. Any cheaper than this? Thanks.
[Edited by HighTech on Jul 4, 2014 at 4:40:02 AM]
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An LCD projector of this vintage likely has polarizer degradation which means a complete optical engine replacement - typically running several hundred dollars in hardware.

Lamps should be original manufacturer branded, otherwise, much like used projectors, you are taking your chances. There are no 'ideal' non manufacturer original lamps that I have heard of to this point, and $100 is an extremely good price on a lamp.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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Quote (AV_Integrated on Jul 6, 2014 10:53:26 AM):
An LCD projector of this vintage likely has polarizer degradation which means a complete optical engine replacement - typically running several hundred dollars in hardware.

Lamps should be original manufacturer branded, otherwise, much like used projectors, you are taking your chances. There are no 'ideal' non manufacturer original lamps that I have heard of to this point, and $100 is an extremely good price on a lamp.

Thanks for chiming in on this. From what I had read, out of the three LCD channels (Red, Green, and Blue), the blue one seems to be the first one suffering degradation in the presence of strong ultraviolet light. So, the question then becomes, why the idle screen of most projectors is defaulted to blue? Considering the fact that the blue LCD panel will weaken overtime, why not use black as the only idle or menu background color.

Having taken the Sony VPL-CX80 and Epson EX7220 apart for cleaning, I am now worried about my Epson EX7220. The material used in manufacture of the unit is cheesy and flimsy. The plastic is thin. Not to mention the cooling fan is small. That is perhaps why, there is one Amazon buyer saying that the back of his Epson Ex7220 where all the input ports are located has actually melted. In contrast, the material used in production of the Sony VPL-CX80 is superb. I guess I should not be comparing a $600 projector to $3,599 MSRP one, right. But no! The workmanship of Epson EX7220 is just not good, IMO.

The OEM bulb for Sony VPL-CX80 goes for $399. This is ridiculous considering that I bought the used projector for much less than that. Perhaps I will try to mount an auto headlight, possibly HID, when this Sony VPL-CX80 bulb runs out luminal power.

As for the "not included with purchase" remote control of Sony VPL-CX80, I have gotten the Hex codes for its IR, so it should be easy to control the Sony VPL-CX80 with a Pronto based IR remote control.
[Edited by HighTech on Jul 8, 2014 at 7:13:11 AM]
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Quote (HighTech on Jul 8, 2014 5:49:02 AM):
Thanks for chiming in on this. From what I had read, out of the three LCD channels (Red, Green, and Blue), the blue one seems to be the first one suffering degradation in the presence of strong ultraviolet light. So, the question then becomes, why the idle screen of most projectors is defaulted to blue? Considering the fact that the blue LCD panel will weaken overtime, why not use black as the only idle or menu background color.

That's a good point I haven't considered before. I'm not sure if it makes much difference due to the light path. Still, with the newer inorganic LCD panels, the degradation which was common on projectors from 8+ years ago is far less common today.

Quote (HighTech on Jul 8, 2014 5:49:02 AM):
Having taken the Sony VPL-CX80 and Epson EX7220 apart for cleaning, I am now worried about my Epson EX7220. The material used in manufacture of the unit is cheesy and flimsy. The plastic is thin. Not to mention the cooling fan is small. That is perhaps why, there is one Amazon buyer saying that the back of his Epson Ex7220 where all the input ports are located has actually melted. In contrast, the material used in production of the Sony VPL-CX80 is superb. I guess I should not be comparing a $600 projector to $3,599 MSRP one, right. But no! The workmanship of Epson EX7220 is just not good, IMO.

It's probably as good as the price suggests. In a world where people want as much product as they possibly can have for the lowest price, it always is the build quality which gets shafted. I'm not defending that build quality, but for the vast majority of people it seems that if they could buy two projectors, the deliver the exact same image quality, and one of them cost twice as much because it has better overall build quality... Well, people buy the cheaper one, because the build quality is 'good enough'.

Of course, a melted chassis typically occurs when a non-original lamp is used instead of the manufacturer original lamp. Once again, someone buys something cheap, hoping for the same quality, then destroys their projector in the process.

Which leads us to...

Quote (HighTech on Jul 8, 2014 5:49:02 AM):
The OEM bulb for Sony VPL-CX80 goes for $399. This is ridiculous considering that I bought the used projector for much less than that. Perhaps I will try to mount an auto headlight, possibly HID, when this Sony VPL-CX80 bulb runs out luminal power.

No, don't go willy-nilly on this.

You can find OEM specified replacement 'bulb-only' lamps for well under $100. But, be aware that proper UV shielding is often non-existent. The lack of a new cage often means that you aren't getting proper directionality from the old lamp cage which can cause overheating, and may introduce additional UV into the system.

I don't think that $399 is a good price, but I think it is the only way to properly protect a projector. Reports of melted optics and cheap after-market lamps failing in just a couple hundred hours are extremely common, so any 3rd party lamp is a gamble.

Quote (HighTech on Jul 8, 2014 5:49:02 AM):
As for the "not included with purchase" remote control of Sony VPL-CX80, I have gotten the Hex codes for its IR, so it should be easy to control the Sony VPL-CX80 with a Pronto based IR remote control.

Oh yeah, I meant to mention that Sony typically uses the same IR codes across their products for years. So almost any universal remote control should be able to handle almost any Sony product out there.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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Quote (AV_Integrated on Jul 8, 2014 8:59:01 AM):
Of course, a melted chassis typically occurs when a non-original lamp is used instead of the manufacturer original lamp. Once again, someone buys something cheap, hoping for the same quality, then destroys their projector in the process.

Thanks for the reply. Well, the Amazon buyer was actually saying his brand new Epson EX7220, which he only used it 4 times for about 3.5 hours each time, had melted after little use. Owning this device myself, I can say this unit really has a poor cooling mechanism, partly due to a small cooling fan it has.

Projectors are in deed very much like Plasma screens. They generate tremendous heat. Electronic components have a certain threshold against heat. When the threshold is overstepped, they will break down and fail to function. So, better cooling mechanism is one basic remedy to make these devices last longer.