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Topic: Throwback Distance = Disappoingint Drawback
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Joined: Aug 25, 2005
Posts: 10
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Hi everyone. My family and I are lock into buying a new house that is being constructed right now. And inside it is a space reserved for "Media" and "Family" rooms which we made into one super home theatre.

Initally, I was considering buying the Sony Qualia 004 for around $25K. I read nothing but good reviews about it and have not encountered a single complaint against it. However, when I tried to find the appropiate distance to put it back from the wall using this website (http://www.projectorcentral.com/Sony-Qualia-004-projection-calculator-pro.htm), I found that I need to put it back 40.9 feet for the picture to fit in a 159 inch diagonal screen. Unfortunately, the most we can go back is 31 ft. Then I was informed about the Fujitsu LPF-D711 which runs for around the same price (but a little bit less expensive). I read the reviews about it and most of them were very good, with some negative comments. But the thing that I like the most is its throwback requirement of only 25.3 feet for the picture to fit in the 159 inch diagonal screen (http://www.projectorcentral.com/Fujitsu-LPF-D711-projection-calculator-pro.htm).

My questions are: 1) Should I buy the Fujitsu instead of the more expensive (and better quality??) Sony Qualia 004 or should I stick with the Sony and settle for a 133 inch diagonal screen instead? 2) Is the Sony Qualia 004 that much better than the Fujitsu D711 or there's very little and subdle differences? Thanks.


Warm regards,
Luong Do
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Joined: Mar 28, 2005
Posts: 12,352
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If you have a bit of patience, you may want to wait to see what comes out at Cedia this year. The Sony is an excellent first generation 1080p unit. But, that is about all it offers and it has very, VERY expensive replacement lamps which you can pretty much count on replacing about once a year if you end up using the theater often.

If I were going to make any recommendation or suggestion, you might want to check out the Sim2 HT500 as these guys are way ahead of the competition when it comes to producing high quality projectors.

NOTE: Most high end projectors, including the Sony, have interchangable lenses! You buy the lens with the projector.

If you go back to the projection distance calculator you will see a note at the bottom that lists the price w/lens at $30,000 and the throw distance based upon using Sony's long throw lens. You just said you want a shorter throw, so you just order the projector with a medium throw lens, not a long throw lens.

If you have not demoed the Qualia, I would do so. Impressive as it is, I find it to be marginally better, at most, than the Sim2 HT300. This is not something I say lightly and I am not a Sim2 dealer... I just consistently see high quality product from Sim2 and the money saved could be put towards a nice Crestron system to control the theater so the whole family can really enjoy the room easily.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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Joined: Apr 19, 2005
Posts: 282
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Wow,

This post almost makes me sick.

Quote:
I was considering buying the Sony Qualia 004 for around $25K

Quote:
should I...settle for a 133 inch diagonal screen instead?

Settle for a 133 inch? I think you should spend $2K on a Panasonic AE700 and get a 145" Image (within the recommended range using projection calculator) at 29.5 feet.

Then give the extra $23 to charity, or so your kids can go to college.

No, seriously. You obviously have the money to burn if you are considering investing 25K into just your projector while you are also buying a new house.

I don't think you're going to get too much input from the users on these forums, as most are not evaluating projectors in your range. Some of the professionals here may have seen the projectors you are reveiwing, but in general you should follow the same guidelines for choosing a 25K projector that you do a $2K one.

- How big of a screen do you want? This is user preference, but should most likely follow specs (like THX) on how large your room is and where the viewing area is. You may want to decide how many people you want to sit and what your seating configuration will be. Then, based on that you can determine optimal screen size.

Only you can know if you will be happy with 133" instead of 159." 159" is a pretty big screen for a home theatre...even 133" is pushing what most people implement. This may be party due just to space requirements, but also the mass of people buy projectors where 133" is close to pushing thier maximum size for recommended brightness.

If you truly could care less about spending 25K on a projector, I don't think you should make your decision because one is "a little bit less expensive", go with the one that gives you the dimensions and quality of picture you want.

I can't help but think that any projector in the 20K range is going to give a phenomenal picture that you would be hard pressed to find fault with, except maybe when doing a side by side comparision with other more expensive models.

If (unlikely) you are just spending 25K because that's what you think you need to spend to get a good picture, you may want to do yourself a favor an check out some sub $10K models. You may be surprised at their quality.
Wag
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Joined: Feb 4, 2005
Posts: 40
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I'm goign to have to agree with AV_Integrated on this one. If you're considering that much money, its definately worth it to wait a while longer and see if something new is going to come and knock your sox off.

On the other hand, you could be tempted to go with a bit cheaper unit. It sounds like 1080i is pretty important to you, but if you consider a primary 720p projector instead, the Optoma H79 could probably do you pretty well. Its tough to say with the screen sizes you're considering, but the H79 does put out quite a bit of light and its about 1/5th the price. If memory serves you can pick one up as low as $5000. Retail I believe is closer to $7000.

I fear that at this stage of the game, I fear you're paying a priemum price for 1080i that is really not warranted. But to each his own. Personally I recently bought a very bottom of the line projector for two very specific reasons. One is the cost factor, and the other is because Projector technology is moving so fast at the moment, that in three years when i'm ready for a new one, the quality and price will likely far surpass even the $10k + models out there today.

My 2 cents.
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Joined: Aug 25, 2005
Posts: 10
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Thank you all for your informative posts. However I forgot to mention that this Media room will now be exposed to three medium windows plus light from the kitchen once we tear down the wall separating the Media room and the Family room. Therefore, I need an extremely good projector that can handle light (true, we will have blinders covering up those windows, but some light will still come in from the kitchen and other places).

Just how good will your recommendations do in this case? Thanks for your help.


Warm regards,
Luong Do
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