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Topic: How Many Lumens do I need?
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Joined: Jul 25, 2005
Posts: 16
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All,
Thanks for the info on formats, etc.
However, which of these projectors will support HD.

IF SP-4805, Optoma H-31, and BenQ 5120, the LCD Sanyo PLV-Z2 HD (1280x720), or even the 1/4HD projectors: Mitsubishi HC3 and Sanyo Z1.

Thanks for all the info.
this is really helpful
paul
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Joined: May 30, 2005
Posts: 465
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"However, which of these projectors will support HD"

if you mean which one will BOTH play an HD source and actually display HD, the Z2 can definitely do that, however with HD-DVD on the way, and much improved Sanyo Z3 probably dropping in price - you might want to at least consider waiting a bit if you are really interested in high performance HD viewing

90 new HD-DVD titles hit the market in about 4 months and that should drive down the price of the Z3 - which is pretty near state of the art for "budget" HD projectors today

DLP hi def will cost you around 2600 min with the Ben Q 7700
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Joined: Mar 28, 2005
Posts: 12,528
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All the projectors you listed will accept HD input.

By definition, a HD display must be 16:9 aspect and must have at least 720 lines. Only the Sanyo Z2 (or better newer models) would be considered 'HD'. But, please read this post:
http://www.bigscreenforums.com/forum_topic.cfm?which=1303

The bottom line is that every home theater projector you listed accepts HD resolutions 720p and 1080i. They will look great, even though their output resolution is limited to 853x480.

What would I go with? Probably the Z2, which, for the money, is a great buy on a very well reviewed projector. If I had the cash, I would definitely swing up to an AE-700 or Z3 which are newer and better than the Z2.

You actually asked 'HOW MANY LUMENS DO I NEED'... If the room is near theater black, then you don't need to worry about it. All home theater projectors are designed to work in black/near black conditions and provide adequate light. Contrast ratio, color, and image processing are far more important than light output.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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Joined: Mar 31, 2005
Posts: 12
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AV Integrated: Fist of all, thanks for all the great advice! I have been reading this forum daily since it stated and have found it extremely valuable.

Here is my question: I understand that if the room is theater dark then a projector like the AE 700 will look great. How will the OptimaH79 look in a theater black room? When properly calibrated for optimal video the H79 is much brighter. Does this mean that you would have to have lights on in the room to prevent from getting headaches or blinded?

I am finally getting ready to purchase a projector now that I am almost finished with my basement. I am considering the Optoma H78DC3 Projector since it is closer to my price range. Not quite as bright as the H79 but still brighter than the AE700. I will probably use a 92” or 106” daylite HCCV or Stewart Firehawk screen. Actually I plan to build my own using their screen material. Anyway, do I need to worry about it getting too bright? Also, do you know if it is possible to by Stewart screen material as you can Daylite?

Cheers,
Schuey
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Joined: Mar 28, 2005
Posts: 12,528
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I am not sure about Stewart material, and as I said, I wouldn't worry about any of the projectors you listed. The H79 or 78 will look awesome in a near theater black room.

Keep in mind, grey screens are really about dealing with unwanted ambient light in a room to preserve contrast. They don't do much in a theater black room. But, they aren't bad either - just personal choice almost.

Calibrated lumens is what matters and if the H78 comes in above the AE-700 it still won't be 'bright' really, just brighter. No issues, no worries.

There are so many great projectors on the market right now it is astounding, it is easier to go right, than wrong with the choices available. As long as it is a home theater projector, you are 90% of the way there.

Messing up cabling... well, that's another story.

If you find a projector is to bright, there are filters that you can use that will cut down on lumen output and may increase contrast. This is very unlikely with the H78 though. Personal choice and easy to add later.
AV Integrated - Theater, whole house audio, and technology consultation during the build and installation process in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
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