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Topic: 2 center speakers into one center speaker connection on AV receiver.
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Joined: Nov 30, 2007
Posts: 13
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The panasonic receiver I have SAXR57 has only one set of connections for the centre speaker but the old yamaha I had allowed 2 centre speakers so thats how everything is pre wired in the walls.
Is it possible to wire together the two centre speakers into the centre connector on the receiver or am I going to blow it up doing that? What ratings would I need to look for on the amp and on the speakers to check if its possible?

thanks
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Joined: Mar 26, 2005
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You're probably going to be OK wiring both speakers into the same connection. To be sure, you need to look at the impedence rating on the speakers, and the minimum impedence on the amplifier. Wiring two speakers in parallel divides the impedence by two, so if the rating of the speakers divided by two is greater than the minimum rating for the amp, it will work just fine.

That said, having two center speakers is probably causing comb filtering and phase cancellation. It's not a terribly good idea from an audio standpoint. But if you're already doing it and haven't noticed a problem, no reason to stop I guess.
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Joined: Mar 25, 2005
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Why do you want to run 2 center channel speakers?
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Joined: Mar 4, 2008
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I'll assume he is doing it to anchor the dialog and such to the center of a large screen by placing one at the top and one at the bottom. Yes, it can cause phase cancellation issues, but sometimes that result is the lesser of two evils compared to having all of your dialog come from the floor or the ceiling. Every situation can be different.

Regarding running the speakers in parallel, it would help if you let us know the make & model of the speakers and your receiver.

In short, if both your centers are 8 ohm speakers, you end up with an 4 Ohm load on your receiver. Many receivers are quite capable of handling a 4 Ohm load at typical volume levels, while others are not. Some speakers are 6 or 4 ohm. Pair those up and you are into 3 and 2 ohm loads. The danger your receiver can't handle it gets much greater as this number gets lower.

A bit of googling with your model number will tell you if your receiver is safe to try. The manufacturer will never tell you they recommend it unless it's a true 4 Ohm built receiver (for liability reasons) but many models have been used successfully to drive 4 Ohm loads successfully. Don't try it till you research it though.

Also, forget about any switch that you may find on your receiver that shows it can toggle into 6 or 4 Ohm mode. This simply limits current to protect the manufacturer from claims of overheating problems. However, this current limiting can do more damage, more easily, than leaving it at 8 Ohms.

Doesn''t answer your question directly because I don't know your gear but I hope it leads you in the right direction.
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Joined: Nov 30, 2007
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Had it set up this way on the Yamaha receiver (circa '96ish) which allowed 2 center speakers. and it worked fine. Just turned out I had six speakers so I thought I'd use them all cause the hook-ups were there. No audible problems. I have a different brand of speakers in the center (altec studio monitor types) than the fronts and rears (sound dynamics bookshelfs).

If it doesn't work with the Panasonic (2spkrs) then I'll just go to one. But its a patch and repair job on the in wall wiring. I'm going to have to play around with which spkrs get use where a bit...As I'm typing I'm thinking it's probably going to be better to run the altecs right and left front and use 1 SD for the centre...it's been a while since our last home theatre setup. Thanks for making me think about it some more....
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