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Posts referring to the Yamaha DPX-830

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Topic:   yamaha dpx-830 projector WHINE

I've got a dpx-830 in the theater here at the house. I love this thing, i can't complain one bit! picture, menu, adjustments, etc, and we paid about 2600 3 years ago, what a deal. unfortunately... the thing has started to make QUITE a whine sound. I dont know what it is. i just swapped out the bulb, I swear somewhere I read a thread calling that the fix. $400 later, its not. so someone, please please fill me in. I'm very technical, so feel free to throw some nerdery my way. the fan is still circulating and movine some air, so surely its working just fine, but i feel like i remember it really pushing some air after some amount of time, when temps are very very high. this has no audible fan noise though. i read that it was one of the quietest projectors out there, but there is a high frequency whine, almost like cathodes in an old tv.
Forum: Projectors
 
Topic:   Yamaha DPX-830 Review: This is one incredible projector!

I AM UPDATING THIS REVIEW BECAUSE IT HAS BEEN POSTED AT http://www.retrevo.com/ READ MORE FOR UPDATES I HAVE ADDED IN AT THE END OF THIS REVIEW _____________________________________________________________ I had mentioned having an interest in getting my hands on the Yamaha DPX-830 for review. This model has created some buzz with consumers that are interested in top notch performance who are not yet ready to make the dive into the more expensive 1080p models available, yet there have never been any full scale reviews of this projector. Well I aim to do my best to see that all that changes now. And I can tell you with joy that the DPX-830 is a solid winner. So here we go.. Yamaha DPX-830 Street prices $1200-$4000 Native 15:9 720p 1000 lumens 4000:1 contrast Darkchip2 DLP DMD chip Natural black technology Brilliant color technology 10 bit video processing Digital lens shift electronic variable iris Sealed optic system special design to prevent light leakage ________________________ REVIEW: Screen neutral gray 110" Projection distance 14.5' 480 DVD via component tested only ________________________ MENU SYSTEM: ____________ I found the Menu tree to be very easy to navigate. Options allow the menu to be placed in 4 different locations on the screen for the best access. There are 4 main menu categories and as each are chosen a drop down menu tree is accessed for further adjustments. Most of the usual menu adjustments were available, however using component for this review rendered no adjustments for color calibrations. There were however color temperature adjustments. I also noticed there was no option in the menu system to check current lamp hours. This was a dissapointment. REMOTE: _______ The remote is a rather small little guy but is well made and solid. It has a backlit option that helps very little because the markings on the buttons are very small and difficult to make out even in a fully lit room. In fact the only way to realistically navigate this remote is to simply memorize where the buttons are for each function. The remote also seems to have a rather limited range. Over all I was simply not all that impresssed with the remote. However, hold tight, because the rest to follow is all very good news. IMAGE QUALITY: ______________ Putting it simply, the Yamaha DPX-830 produces one of the sharpest, well saturated, and most engaging images I have ever seen on a DLP or LCD projector regaurdless of native resolution. Yamaha included an all glass Minolta optic system into the DPX-830 and I am certain this has much to do with the projector's ability to render a smooth yet sharp image. Added to that Yamaha also implemented additional high quality components into this projector to assure superb operation and reliability. Something Yamaha has always been very good at with most of their electronics for decades. 10 bit video processing assures smooth, artifact free images. I did on occasion see some minor artifacts here and there but later realized that the image processing option needs to be engaged within the menu system in order for it to be active. This is unusual because most projectors are made with image processing technology always active and there is no way to turn it off or on. Once engaged I saw very little in the way of motion artifacts or other irritating image disturbances. I first popped in a very good transfer of 'Mary Poppins'. The image was absolutely stunning. Deep, accurate color saturation, crystal clear opening credits with no hint of jaggies or other artifacts, and perfectly rendered skin tones. Blacks were solid and without a doubt very inky and rich with only a hint of very dim gray in some of the darkest sequences. However at this point the iris was all the way open allowing full light to pass through the lens. The menu tree allows both contrast and brightness to range between 0-30. I set them both at 15. Gamma was at default as was color temperature, and the lamp on normal mode. I popped in numerous other DVD's, most notably the newest transfer two disc set of 'A Clockwork Orange'. Once again blacks were over all extremely good, Skin tones were dead on, and color saturation was deep and inky. Engaging brilliant color caused this dvd to look a bit oversaturated, but this was not the case with most other dvd's using brilliant color. With all dvd's shadow detail was superb. In fact the DXP-830 produced better shadow detail than any other projector I have ever used including the Infocus SP7210 which also has high end components, a darkchip3 dmd chip, and all glass Zeiss optics. The DPX-830 is clearly a better projector over all and simply out performed the 7210 in most categories. Give or take the Yamaha DPX-830 renders an incredible image that rivals most any projector I have ever used or tested. PHYSICAL CONSTRUCTION: ______________________ Over all the DPX-830 is built like a tank. It has a plastic body. It feels solid and sturdy none the less. I was suprised that it is a rather large projector however measuring 14" x 12" x 4". It weighs in at about 14 pounds. The rear of the unit has inputs for component, VGA, HDMI(1), USB, composite, S-Video, and a screen trigger input. Air vents out of the left side forward of the unit. The front of the unit is constructed well so that no light spill can escape or affect surrounding viewing areas. LUMENS: _______ With the lamp in normal mode and the gamma set to allow the most brightness as possible to project, brilliant color engaged, and projecting a full white image to the screen, I measured a wopping 766 lumens. Obviously this falls rather short of the claimed 1000 lumens, but nearly all projectors fail to reach the actual spec rated lumen level. Many projectors rated at 1000 lumens can only put out maybe 650 lumens at their brightest settings. And keep in mind that even 350-400 actual lumens can project a bright and vivid image in a darkended room. I then set up the projector for the best cinema modes to view movies and dvd's, set the iris to close all the way, and set the lamp to eco mode(cinema). And with a full white image I measured 485 lumens. Many projectors is these more suitable modes for viewing movies can value as little as 350 lumens. And I have to say the image was still vivid and bright. So yes, the Yamaha DPX-830 is a fairly bright projector even in it's dimmest modes. CONTRAST: _________ No problem here. The DPX-830 delivers incredible contrast, and it clearly deserves the rather meager 4000:1 contrast rating. Source material that included both bright and dark images at the same time were rendered beautifully. Blacks were deep and rich while brighter areas of the image were vivid and natural. Yet images that included sky areas were rendered superbly with little washout of details in clouds, distant mountains or hills that are often lost of many other projectors. BLACK LEVELS: _____________ Over all blacks were superb for a darkchip2 DLP projector rated at 4000:1. Even with the iris opened fully and brilliant color engaged, images like the dark sequences that take place within Chris McNeil's House in 'The Exorcist' looked fairly good, There was still plenty of shadow detail and only a hint of very dull gray light making it into the image. Only in the very darkest source material was there any evidence of some image washout, but this is true of the very best DLP models on the market rated as high as 6500:1 or even higher. But mind you, the iris was opened, not closed. So I closed the iris and there was a fairly good improvement. Never did the DPX-830 deliver the kind of blacks a CRT projector can, but sometimes it did come close. In fact the DPX-830 beat the darkchip3 of the Infocus SP7210 easily, delivering superior blacks and contrast. SHADOW DETAIL: ______________ Hands down the DPX-830 delivers very good shadow detail that is lost on most other DLP and LCD projectors. In fact, though I am not certain, I feel convinced that the DPX-830 produces the best shadow detail I have personally seen on any digital projector. COLOR ACCURACY: _______________ Using component as mentioned, has it's limitations if you are interested in calibrating color, because there simply is no color calibration options when the component input is active, with the exception of color temperature settings which are precalibrated themselves. The good news is that the factory color calibration is superb, rendering a color pallet that is extremely close to D6500K. In fact, it was so good I felt I could not have calibrated the unit better than it was calibrated in the factory. Really, very accurate color with no noticable shift to green, yellow, blue or red. PIXEL VISIBILITY: _________________ Again- Great news! The Pixel visibility of the DPX-830 is extremely easy on the eye's. I was able to see the pixels occasionally, but even then it was very nice to see these pixels as no more than a very minor noticable artifact at distances of no more than 4' from the screen. Even then it wasn't very bothersome. AUDIBLE NOISE: ______________ Here is some great news. The DPX-830 runs extremely quiet. The fan can be heard if the enviroment is totally silent and the subject is seated within 3' of the projector, but even then it's a very dull sound. This is the quietest projector I have ever heard with the exception of the Optoma H78DC3. OFFSET AND PLACEMENT FLEXIBILITY: _________________________________ Again, good news folks! The Yamaha DPX-830 has a much lower offset than most other DLP projectors I have been familiar with. The spec ratings on it can be ignored to some degree. What I can tell you is that there is some offset but the unit has options that render this fact moot. I was able to seat the unit on a table as much as 26" off the floor without the need to raise the front leg of the unit. This placed the image at 66" off the floor to the center of the screen, placing the bottum of the image at 40" from the floor. That makes an offset of 14". However there is also a digital image shift function capable of moving the image either 1' up or 1' down on the screen, so the DPX-830 has very good placement flexibility short of those units that contain a physical lens shift. VERDICT? ________ The Yamaha DPX-830 is one of the very best DLP projectors I have ever seen, owned or used. It delivers razor sharp images that are well saturated with accurate color. The projector delivers stunning brightness that offers enough space to use the unit in a room with moderate ambient lighting. Yamaha has really created a solid performer with the DPX-830. I am giving it my highest marks. Though screenshots don't tell you much I will add some later. Some rather weak projectors can appear to have an excellent image over the internet when in fact if you see it in person you'd be inclined to feel the images you saw on the net were much more appealing. I will do my best to adjust the images after they are taken to reflect what the human eye really sees. ____________________________UPDATES________________________ After familiarizing my self with the Yamaha DPX-830 for a good long time now I have discovered a few more interesting advantages. This projector can deliver suprising brightness when it is needed but it can also deliver extroardinary blacks and contrast as well when lighting conditions accomodate it. I discovered rich and deep blacks were possible without sacrificing any of the punch and dynamic saturation of the image. I accomplished this by closing the iris and placing the lamp in cinema mode(eco mode). Then by activating brilliant color and choosing the brightest gamma mode, the DPX-830 delivers impressive color saturation as well as plenty of brightness while still rendering superb blacks and a wide range between the brightest images and the darkest ones, resulting in amazing contrast. Another amazing addition to the DPX-830 is it's uncanny ability to produce a smooth natural image even when the most demanding source material is present on the screen. As mentioned before, one of the DPX-830's greatest strengths is it's ability to deliver all the intended detail when it is meant to be there that is often lost on most other projectors retailing for under $5000. Images in the foreground where hills, mountains, clouds and sky are present in the background still show all the detail they should in the distant yonder with little washout. Details that can hardly be seen on many projectors even in their best gamma modes for cinema like images. Often these modes result in loss of punch and brightness. A duller image. The DPX-830 delivers as much detail as one could expect from a digital projector without loss of punch or brightness. One last detail that shouldn't go unmentioned is the video processing of this projector. The DPX-830 does a truly remarkable job at pretty much eliminating all together annoying jaggies and other video artifacts. After viewing hours and hours of different DVD transfers I rarely if ever see any video noise that shouldn't be there or other abnormalities. Again the DPX-830 is the only 720p native projector on the market in it's price range that can deliver the kind of performance that it does. many consumers are moving up to native 1080p models. For those that really don't see the need to plunge into that terriroty just yet, the DPX-830 is one of the very best projectors out there that can still deliver and stunning HD or 480i image experience for a price that, while still higher priced than budget models, is still an incredible bargain none the less. it is dissapointing that Yamaha has seemingly chosen to discontinue this model. A mistake that I feel is somewhat profound. At least for the time being.
Forum: Projectors
 
Topic:   Optoma H79 versus Mitsu HC1500

Oh- by the way, I just purchased a Yamaha Dpx-830sl 720p Digital Projector. I sometimes purchase projectors if they are popular and want to do an agressive review of them. Or if they have no reviews but are thought to be especally worth a review. This was the case with the Yamaha DPX-830xl. The only review of any kind on it is at UltimateAVmag.com, but all that was said was that someone saw it perform at a convention or something and liked it. So when it arrives I will give it a full review and post it here at the forum. it is being sold here and there for about $1200-$3900
Forum: Projectors
 
Topic:   Duct Work in the way

[QUOTE=KCJACK|Feb 28, 2007 5:08:04 AM] [/QUOTE] Whoops, I forgot to add the post. Pardon my first post. I too am finishing a basement and part of it is a home theater. I ran into the same issue wuth duct work and after checking code and finding out what type of heat loss I could possibly gain I went with flexible duct that runs through my floor joists and got rid of a needed soffet.Suddenly screen size can go up and this opens up the room more. Room size in total is 14ft wide by 23 ft long after framing and drywall. Hope this helps. Went with a flexible insulated duct that won,t sweat.
 
Topic:   Duct Work in the way

[QUOTE=jsaint06|Feb 27, 2007 11:57:03 PM] I am in the middle of finishing my entire basement and am working on my HT room. The room is approx 20L X 15W. This is the measurements before any framing, drywall etc is up. My problem is that on the right side of the room I have the ductwork. I want to place my screen on the long end of the room but am concerned that when I frame around the ductwork and put the ceiling up that it may draw your attention away from the screen because you will see this "bump out" from the right hand side of the screen. Has anyone else ran into this problem? Am I concerned over nothing. I could turn the room the other way but then my throw distance would only be approx 15 ft which will reduce the size of my screen alot. Any ideas or feedback would be great....this forum has been great for my planning and setup... [/QUOTE]